Wilson County Black History Committee

Home | About Us | Roy Bailey African American Museum | Calendar | Support

Roy Bailey African American Museum

Paying homage to our ancestors' struggles and successes

webassets/PickettChapel.jpg
Pickett Chapel

The Roy Bailey African American History Center and Museum was established in 2004 by the Wilson County Black History Committee, a group of men and women dedicated to the memory of the founders and families of Wilson County's thriving African American community.

The history of Wilson County boasts a strong community of businessmen and women, educators, clergy and famililes who built a solid foundation for African American citizens who live and thrive today in the cities of Lebanon, Mt. Juliet and Watertown, Tennessee.

The Roy Bailey African American History Center pays homage to their work, their struggles and their successes.

The museum's artifacts and research materials are currently displayed in a small museum space at 115 East Main Street in Lebanon, just off the Square. the museum is open to the public three days a week.

In 2007, the committee purchased the historic building on East Market Street that housed Pickett Chapel Methodist Church. After renovation, it will become the site of the Roy Bailey African American History Center and Museum, as well as a resource for the entire community and headquarters of the Wilson County Black History Committee.

webassets/MuseumDisplay.JPG
Museum displays showcase a variety of topics related to the area's history.
webassets/MuseumDisplayMilitary.JPG
The museum pays tribute to African-American military heroes.

Roy Bailey, 1920 - 1997
webassets/RoyBaileygraveyard.jpg
Mr. Bailey played an active role in Wilson County history, including restoration of cemeteries.
 

The History Center is named in honor of community activist Roy Bailey. Until his death, Mr. Bailey was a member of the Wilson County Black History Committee and the primary motivating force behind In Their Own Voices: An Account of the Presence of African Americans in Wilson County, published by the WCBHC in 1999. He was one of the founders of the local NAACP and the Congress of Racial Equality. during the 1960s, he took a leading role in the Civil Rights movement and school desegregation.

Hours

The Roy Bailey African American History Center, 115 East Main Street, Suite B, is open Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., and by appointment.

Enter your starting address:
Street Address: 
City: 
State: 
ZIP Code: 

Copyright 2009 - 2013, Wilson County Black History Committee
115 East Main Street, Lebanon, Tennessee, 37087
615.449.2911